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Security, Privacy and Information Governance

Category: GDPR



Stay In Touch! Email Marketing After the GDPR

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Part I: Untangling the GDPR and the e-Privacy Directive

This is the first post in a four part series on GDPR and email marketing.

Your email in-box has probably finally recovered from the wave of GDPR opt-in requests and notices that peaked around May 25th. But, if you’ve followed the privacy press or the statements from EU regulators, you’re probably left wondering what it was all for. Many statements made in news stories (both in the U.S. and the EU) and by commentators have claimed that the GDPR means no one can send marketing emails any more without your permission. But, other stories suggest that the opt-in emails and privacy notices were unnecessary or, even, inappropriate. Who’s right? And what email marketing is allowed now?

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Information Governance Can Still Help Your Organization with GDPR Compliance

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The highly-anticipated enforcement date of May 25th has come and gone, but the opportunity to use information governance (IG) to bolster your organization’s compliance with the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) still exists.

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Information Governance Gains Traction, Maturity, and Value Proposition: State of IG Report

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The Information Governance Initiative (IGI) recently released its third annual “State of Information Governance” report . Highlights include a sharp rise in IG projects underway and a shift toward organizations deriving value out of properly stored data. Indeed, nearly twice as many respondents (176percent of prior-year baseline) indicated that they are extracting business value from their information.

While external factors to include data breaches and data privacy regulations largely drive IG projects, there is mounting internal pressure to reduce storage costs, limit exposure to potential data breaches, and consolidate data. IGI found that respondents overwhelmingly agreed that information governance is an essential component of internal and external cybersecurity.

Below are key takeaways from the report, including respondent results and IGI’s analysis and recommendations.

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European Commission Issues GDPR Guidance

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The European Commission (EC) recently issued online guidance on the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), a sweeping European Union (EU) data protection legislation that will take effect on May 25, 2018.  The guidance is intended to be used as a tool to help businesses as well as the EC, national data protection authorities, EU Member States, and other national administrations prepare for the GDPR.  To date, only 2 EU Member States – Germany and Austria – have adopted the relevant national legislation to be in compliance with GDPR.

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Recap of Our General Data Protection Regulation Webinar Series

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In preparation for the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), set to take effect in the EU on May 25, 2018, we have hosted a series of webinars to help attendees navigate the changing data protection landscape. The GDPR is the EU’s most important change in data privacy regulation in 20 years, replacing the 1995 Data Protection Directive, and will affect any company that processes data pertaining to individuals in the EU. Please find more information on the presentations below:

Article 29 Working Party Releases Guideline WP260 on Transparency under the GDPR

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The Article 29 Working Party (WP29) released two guideline documents, WP259 and WP260, on the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) concepts of consent and transparency.  Comments on both documents will be accepted by the Working Party through January 23, 2018 after which the WP 29 working party will issue final guidance. WP29 is an independent European advisory body on data protection and privacy.

This blog post focuses on WP260, the guideline on transparency. Our companion post on WP259, the guideline on consent can be read here.

Transparency has long been a fundamental feature of EU privacy law and is an overarching obligation under the GDPR. The draft guideline notes that a central consideration of the principle of transparency is that the data subject should be able to determine in advance what the scope and consequences of the processing entails. Transparency applies in three central areas:

  • The provision of information to data subjects related to the fair processing of their personal data.
  • How data controllers communicate with data subjects in relation to their rights under the GDPR.
  • How data controllers facilitate the exercise by data subjects of their rights.

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